Antiques and Collectibles - Fruit Crate Labels For Sale - Antique Label Company has an
  art gallery of fruit labels that are colorful antique posters from the first half of the last century.


GOEHRING Brand, Original Grape Lug fruit Box label, framed

Tokay Grapes, GOEHRING Brand vintage old collectible railroad commercial art crate poster, framed
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$35.00
SKU:
2138
Qty:
 
 
 
 
 
 

This GOEHRING Brand  fruit crate label pictures California Grapes, Tokays, by P.J. Goehring of  Victor, San joaquin valley,
California. Railroad cars stand beside a large fruit packing shed; freight-train cars are stenciled "P.F.E."; wine grapes, a plum and a loquat illustrate each edge of this grape crate fruit lug box label long ago lithographed by the Lodi Printing Company. Custom framed in copper and glass ready to decorate your Home or Railroad Yard. It Measures approx. 4 1/2 x 13 inches.

"Grapes are a major California agricultural product, consumed as tables grapes, raisins, and wine. While grapes are grown throughout California, table grapes are grown mainly on the east side of the San Joaquin valley in central California, in Tulare, San Joaquin, Kern and Fresno counties. Many varieties of grapes are grown, with Thompson Seedless, Emperor, Tokay and Malaga being of key commercial importance. Grapes are very perishable, and require careful handling to prevent crushing. They are packed in flat lug boxes containing about 25 pounds of grapes, with labels about 13" x 4". Wooden boxes were used until the early 1960's. The long narrow shape of grape labels requires different design treatments than those on the relatively square labels used for other fruit boxes. Effective designs are those which feature extended lettering and elongated images. Fruit Box Labels, McClelland and Last, 1983" (Out of Print) "With the completion of the transcontinental railroads in the 1880's it became possible to ship western agricultural produce to midwestern and eastern markets. Fruit, which had remained unpicked in western orchards due to lack of demand, suddenly became commercially valuable, and a new industry developed. The first products shipped were oranges and lemons from southern California, grapes from central California, and apples and pears from northern California, Oregon and Washington. As railroad refrigeration techniques became more sophisticated, perishable produce such as melons, lettuce and tomatoes also were shipped. A complex packing, shipping and marketing network was developed to transfer this wide variety of western agricultural produce to eastern consumers. The fruit box label was developed to identify and advertise these products. This colorful paper poster was pasted on the end of the wooden box; serving as a means of communication between the grower and customer. Tens of thousands of different label designs were used on billions of boxes until the 1950's when wooden boxes were replaced by cardboard boxes with cheaper pre-printed label information. The paper labels, nearly all designed and printed in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and Portland, serve as a historical record of West Coast commercial art." Fruit Box Labels, McClelland & Last 1983 (Out of Print) "With the completion of the transcontinental railroads in the 1880's it became possible to ship western agricultural produce to midwestern and eastern markets. Fruit, which had remained unpicked in western orchards due to lack of demand, suddenly became commercially valuable, and a new industry developed. The first products shipped were oranges and lemons from southern California, grapes from central California, and apples and pears from northern California, Oregon and Washington. As railroad refrigeration techniques became more sophisticated, perishable produce such as melons, lettuce and tomatoes also were shipped. A complex packing, shipping and marketing network was developed to transfer this wide variety of western agricultural produce to eastern consumers. The fruit box label was developed to identify and advertise these products. This colorful paper poster was pasted on the end of the wooden box; serving as a means of communication between the grower and customer. Tens of thousands of different label designs were used on billions of boxes until the 1950's when wooden boxes were replaced by cardboard boxes with cheaper pre-printed label information. The paper labels, nearly all designed and printed in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and Portland, serve as a historical record of West Coast commercial art." Fruit Box Labels, McClelland & Last 1983 (Out of Print) • Since Western Fruit Crate Labels derive from the concept of Wine Bottle Labeling in the late 1800’s I’ve included here the titles of a few tomes on the small colorful wine labels. • A Very Good Year: The Journey of a California Wine from Vine to Table by Mike Weiss • The Emperor of Wine: The Rise of Robert M. Parker, Jr. and the Reign of American Taste by Elin McCoy • Understanding Wine Labels: A Complete Guide to the Wine Labels of the World (Mitchell Beazley Wine Made Easy) by Simon Woods • Spinning the Bottle by Harvey Posert • Wine Label Language by Peter Saunders • Soils for Fine Wines by Robert E. White • Imagery: Art for Wine by Bob L. Nugent “The wine label is a powerful icon of modern civilization. It is a precious object of art that symbolizes and disseminates the cultural and spiritual values of the land where wine is grown…Wine label design has undergone a renaissance where art meets marketing in the most powerful way, penetrating the subconscious, utilizing the power of suggestion to imply flavor and quality.” Icon: Art of the Wine Label by Jeffrey Caldeway and Chuck House, May 2003